October 3, 2022

Paramenino

For First-Rate Health

Health care providers share impact of COVID-19 antibody treatment

Monoclonal antibody treatments are being used by more and more Iowa health care providers to help lessen the severity of COVID-19 in some cases. The treatment involves four injections right under the skin for people who qualify for the treatment. People who qualify for the treatment could include anyone who has tested positive and has symptoms with 10 days or if someone has been exposed to COVID-19.”Our body takes a little bit of time to build up our antibodies,” said Leslie Herron, a pharmacist and the owner of Sumpter Pharmacy in Adel. “But in the meantime, if we have these monoclonal antibodies available for treatment, we can dump them in basically, and they can get to work right away.” Herron and the Sumpter Pharmacy started offering the treatment in late September. They have administered around 60 treatments so far. People have to call Sumpter Pharmacy and do a pre-screening to see if they qualify for the treatment. Herron and the team transformed a portable rental unit and placed it behind the building to administer the treatments. The unit has all the supplies they need, including a heater to keep people warm. “This was the best solution to prevent somebody from coming in the store and exposing my staff and customers,” Herron said. Following the injections, people have to wait outside of the pharmacy in their vehicles for an hour. Herron says it’s a requirement to make sure there are no adverse effects. However, healthcare providers continue to stress that it is not a substitute for the vaccine. “People can’t think, ‘Oh, I really don’t want the vaccine. If I get COVID, I’ll just keep going and getting monoclonal antibody treatments’. It doesn’t work that way,” Herron said. Physicians and some pharmacies across Iowa also offer the treatment.

Monoclonal antibody treatments are being used by more and more Iowa health care providers to help lessen the severity of COVID-19 in some cases.

The treatment involves four injections right under the skin for people who qualify for the treatment. People who qualify for the treatment could include anyone who has tested positive and has symptoms with 10 days or if someone has been exposed to COVID-19.

“Our body takes a little bit of time to build up our antibodies,” said Leslie Herron, a pharmacist and the owner of Sumpter Pharmacy in Adel. “But in the meantime, if we have these monoclonal antibodies available for treatment, we can dump them in basically, and they can get to work right away.”

Herron and the Sumpter Pharmacy started offering the treatment in late September. They have administered around 60 treatments so far.

People have to call Sumpter Pharmacy and do a pre-screening to see if they qualify for the treatment. Herron and the team transformed a portable rental unit and placed it behind the building to administer the treatments. The unit has all the supplies they need, including a heater to keep people warm.

“This was the best solution to prevent somebody from coming in the store and exposing my staff and customers,” Herron said.

Following the injections, people have to wait outside of the pharmacy in their vehicles for an hour. Herron says it’s a requirement to make sure there are no adverse effects. However, healthcare providers continue to stress that it is not a substitute for the vaccine.

“People can’t think, ‘Oh, I really don’t want the vaccine. If I get COVID, I’ll just keep going and getting monoclonal antibody treatments’. It doesn’t work that way,” Herron said.

Physicians and some pharmacies across Iowa also offer the treatment.

https://www.kcci.com/article/iowa-health-care-providers-share-impact-of-antibody-treatment-against-covid-19/38228318